IT Cost Cutting and Revenue Enhancing Projects

scissorsIn the current economic climate the CIOs and IT managers are constantly pushed to “do more with less”. However, blindly following this mantra can be a recipe for disaster. These days IT budgets are getting squeezed and there are fewer resources to go around however, literally trying to “do more with less” is the wrong approach. The “do more” approach implies that IT operations were not running efficiently and there was a lot of fat that could be trimmed — quite often that is simply not the case. It is not always possible to find a person or a piece of hardware that is sitting idle which can be cut from the budget without impacting something. However, in most IT departments there are still a lot of opportunities to save cost. But the “do more with less” mantra’s approach of actually trying to do more with less maybe flawed! Instead the right slogan should be something along the lines of “work smarter” or “smart utilization of shrinking resources”; not exactly catchy but conveys what is really needed.

polar bearWhen the times are tough IT departments tend to hunker down and act like hibernating bears – they reduce all activity (especially new projects) to a minimum and try to ride out the winter, not recognizing the opportunity that a recession brings. A more productive approach is to rethink your IT strategy, initiate new projects that enhance your competitive advantage, cut those that don’t, and reinvigorate the IT department in better alignment with the business needs and a more efficient cost structure. The economic climate and the renewed focus on cost reduction provides the much needed impetus to push new initiatives through that couldn’t be done before. Corporate strategy guru Richard Rumelt says,

“There are only two paths to substantially higher performance, one is through continued new inventions and the other requires exploiting changes in your environment.”

Inventing something substantial and new is not always easy or even possible but as the luck would have it the winds of change is blowing pretty hard these days both in technology and in the business environment. Cloud computing has emerged as a disruptive technology and is changing the way applications are built and deployed. Virtualization is changing the way IT departments buy hardware and build data centers. There is a renewed focus on enterprise wide information systems and emergence of new software and techniques have made business intelligence affordable and easy to deploy. These are all signs of major changes afoot in the IT industry. On the business side of the equation the current economic climate is reshaping the landscape and a new breed of winners and losers is sure to emerge. What is needed is a vision, strategy, and will to capitalize on these opportunities and turn them into competitive advantage. Recently a health care client of ours spent roughly $1 million on a BI and data strategy initiative and realized $5 million in savings in the first year due to increased operational efficiency.
 
Broadly speaking IT initiatives can be evaluated along two dimensions cost efficiency and competitive advantage. Cost efficiency defines a project’s ability to lower the cost structure and help you run operations more efficiently. Projects along the competitive advantage dimension provide greater insight into your business and/or market trends and help you gain an edge on the competition. Quite often projects along this dimension rely on an early mover’s advantage which overtime may turn into a “me too” as the competitors jump aboard the same bandwagon. The life of such a competitive advantage can be extended by superior execution but overtime it will fade – think supply-chain automation that gave Dell its competitive advantage in early years. Therefore such projects should be approached with a sense of urgency as each passing day erodes the potential for higher profits. In this framework each project can be considered to have a component of each dimension and can be plotted along these dimensions to help you prioritize projects that can turn recession into an opportunity for gaining competitive edge. Here are six initiatives that can help you break the IT hibernation, help you lower your cost structure, and gain an edge on the competition:

Figure-1-Categorization-of-

Figure 1: Categorization of IT Projects 

Figure-2-Key-Benefits

In the current economic climate no project can go too far without an ROI justification and calculating ROI for an IT project especially something that does not directly produce revenue can be notoriously hard. While calculating ROI for these projects is beyond the scope of this article I hope to return to this issue soon with templates to help you get through the scrutiny of the CFO’s office. For now I will leave you with the thought that ROI can be thought of in terms three components:

  • A value statement
  • Hard ROI (direct ROI)
  • Soft ROI (indirect ROI)

Each one is progressively harder to calculate and requires additional level of rigor and detail but improves the accuracy of calculation. I hope to discuss this subject in more detail in future blog entries.

Doublin’ Down in Hard Times

Hard times are definitely here.  By this time everybody in IT-land has done the obvious: frozen maintenance where possible, put off hardware and software upgrades, outsourced where possible, trimmed heads (contractors, consultants, staff), pushed BI/CPM/EPM analytics projects forward, and tuned up data and web resources.

Now is the time to think outside the bunker!

IT needs to consider what will need to be done to nurture the green shoots poking through the nuclear fallout. All of the talking heads and pundits see them ( glowing with radiation or whatever) and  the utmost must be done to make sure they survive and grow or we shall all sink into the abyss!

This is the time to double down in IT (poker speak).  It is not about heavily hyped Cloud Computing or the latest must-have tech gadget, but about something much more mundane and boring: improving the business process.  There, I’ve said it, what could possibly be more boring?  It doesn’t even plug-in.  In fact (shudder!), it may be partially manual.

Business process is what gets the job done (feeding our paychecks!).  Recessions are historically the perfect time to revise and streamline (supercharge ’em!)  existing business processes because it allows the company to accelerate ahead of the pack coming out of the recession.  In addition, recession acts as something of a time-out for everybody (I only got beatings, no time-outs for me), like the yellow flag during a NASCAR race.  When the yellow flag is out, time to hit the pits for gas and tires.  Double down when it is slow to go faster when things speed up again, obviously the only thing to do.

How? is usually the question.  The best first step is to have existing business processes documented and reviewed.  Neither the staff involved driving the process at the moment nor the business analysts (internal or consultants) are that busy at the moment.  That means any economic or dollar cost of doubling will be minimized under the economic yellow flag.  The second step is to look for best practice, then glance ouside-the-box to maximize improvement.  The third step is to look for supporting technology to supercharge the newly streamlined business process (I knew I could get some IT in there to justify my miserable existance!).

Small and medium businesses get the biggest bang for the buck (just picture trying to gas and change the tires on the Exxon Valdez at Daytona) with this strategy.  This process allows SMBs to leapfrog the best practice and technology research the Global 2000 have done and cut to the chase without the pioneer’s cost (damn those arrows in the backside hurt!).  Plus implementation is cheaper during recession ( I love to be on the buy-side).  The hardware, software, and integration guys have to keep busy so they cut prices to the bone.

The way forward is clear, IT only needs to lead the way, following is kind of boring anyway.

Enterprise Information Strategy in 2009

If you’ve been in an IT-related role for more than 10 years, you’ve likely enjoyed the boom and bust the economy has provided. Healthier times enhance business capabilities in the form of multi-million dollar, cross organization implementations, while leaner times like these afford only the most critical needs to be fulfilled. So while the volatility wreaks havoc on your organization, one IT spend continues to stay strong. Strategy.

Strategy is a sound investment in prosperous times since the confirmation it provides protects the investment of larger scale initiatives. For example, a company committed to providing better customer service and market additional products into its customer base will undertake a 2 to 3 year set of tactical CRM initiatives. Success factors include the three usual suspects, ‘People, Process and Technology’, and aligning each with an ideal future state vision is critical.

A well executed strategy provides an education for stakeholders and builds consensus among individuals who may have never sat around the same conference room table before. It coalesces and prioritizes goals and objectives, drafts a future state architectural blueprint and describes business processes that will endure, and establishes a long term Road Map that orchestrates incremental efforts and illustrates progress.

So if strategy is a safe bet in better times, why invest in one now?  For executives I’ve met with most recently (Q3 and Q4 2008), a popular form of strategy is analogous to grandma’s attic. At some point, it may have occurred to you to look in grandma’s attic for something that may be useful, and if you’re truly fortunate, there may be something extremely valuable you hadn’t counted on. For C-level executives looking for ways to improve their bottom lines, the same treasure hunt exists in the corporate information they already possess.

To understand whether your enterprise information holds hidden treasures, explore these 10 questions with your organization. Answering ‘No’ or ‘Not sure’ to any questions that have exceptional relevance within your organization may suggest looking into an Enterprise Information Strategy enagement.

  1. Do visionaries within my company have visibility to key performance indicators that drive revenue or lower costs?
  2. Do I understand who my customers are and which products they own?
  3. Am I able to confidently market additional products into my existing customer base?
  4. Do I possess data today that would provide value to complimentary industries through new information based offerings?
  5. Will my information platforms readily scale and integrate to meet the demands of company growth through acquisition?
  6. Am I leveraging the most cost effective RDBMS software and warehouse appliance technologies?
  7. Do I understand the systemic data quality issues that exist in the information I disseminate?
  8. Do the organizations I support understand the reporting limitations of my current state architecture?
  9. Is there an architectural blueprint that illustrates an ideal 2 to 3 year business intelligence future state?
  10. Does my company have visibility to a Road Map that timelines planned projects and the incremental delivery of new business insights?